Dangerous drug pipeline attracts Detroit drug dealers to Hunting - Beckley, Bluefield & Lewisburg News, Weather, Sports

Dangerous drug pipeline attracts Detroit drug dealers to Huntington, WV

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Drug dealers can make quick cash in the Tri-State area. Drug dealers can make quick cash in the Tri-State area.
The dangerous drug pipeline continues to bring drug dealers from the Motor City to the Tri-State area. 

Law enforcement agencies in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia said despite their efforts, it's impossible to eliminate the trafficking problem completely. 

Detroit is less than 350 miles away from Huntington.  It's an easy plane, bus, or car ride away for people who are looking to sell drugs.

"More drugs are coming into our area from Detroit and out of state places and it's something we have to deal with," said Sgt. G.N. Losh with the West Virginia State Police.

For years, the city of Huntington has been a destination for drug dealers, especially those from Detroit.

Losh said the demand for pills and heroin is so high, drug dealers call this city 'Moneyton.' 

"It's not at a point where we are happy with it.  It's not at a very high point either, but it's something we give as much attention to as we can," said Chief Deputy Doug Ferguson with the Cabell County Sheriff's Department.

Part of the problem is that these drug dealers are often hard to catch. They travel back and forth every two to three weeks, trying to stay under the radar of detectives who are trying to track them.  

"They are hiring people to drive them. Some are using taxis. Buses, cars, you name it. Any way to get into the area, change things up," Sgt. Losh said.

Buses come to Huntington straight from Detroit twice a day.  Tickets are just $85, a small fee to pay for a big profit here.

"You know the drug dealers are fighting for every square inch up there and down here, it is a little more laid back," Losh said.

Drug task force agents said there are at least a couple hundred drug dealers in Cabell County alone.  More than half of those arrested for drugs and violent crimes are out of state, specifically Detroit, they said.