LEWISBURG, WV (WVNS) — Two members of the Greenbrier Historical Society were honored this past Sunday, October 9, 2022 with an award that honors the difference they make in the community.

The Betty Woods “Snookie” Nutting Award is given to individuals who embody the spirit and dedication to making a difference in the community with the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture, and History. Dr. Kim Arbogast McBride and Dr. W. Stephen McBride were honored with the award in a ceremony at Independence Hall in Wheeling, WV.

The McBrides have led multiple archaeological excavations for early forts in West Virginia and Kentucky for the last 40 years. Their focus is the frontier forts from the French and Indian War to the American Revolution.

Curator Randall Reid-Smith of the WV Department of Arts, Culture and History explains the meaning of the various parts of the Betty Woods “Snookie” Nutting Award to Dr. Kim McBride and Dr. Stephen McBride.
Curator Randall Reid-Smith of the WV Department of Arts, Culture and History explains the meaning of the various parts of the Betty Woods “Snookie” Nutting Award to Dr. Kim McBride and Dr. Stephen McBride.

Their work has even been local to southern West Virginia with the excavation of Arbuckle’s Fort in Greenbrier County, Cook’s Fort in Monroe County, Jarrett’s Fort in Monroe County, and Warwick’s Fort in Pocahontas County. Their work was even essential to the restoration of the Blue Sulphur Springs Pavilion.

“We share the credit for successful archaeology projects with the many supporting agencies and the landowners who protect these sites. The Frontier Forts project would not have been sustained without the three decades of support by the Summers County Historic Landmarks Commission.”

Dr. Kim McBride, member of the Board of Directors of GHS.

Now retired and living in Lewisburg, they have formed Greenbrier Valley Archaeology, Inc. to facilitate research and educational outreach about frontier settlement.